Integrity: Understanding Match-fixing

IFMA’s five pillars are Honour, Tradition, Respect, Excellence and Fair Play. Match-fixing violates the pillar of Fair Play and the code of honour inherent in the sport.

What is considered a match-fixing related offense by IFMA?

a. When an athlete, official or member of the entourage participates or engages in betting or gambling related to his or her own sport event or competition.

b. When an athlete or official fails to perform to the best of his or her abilities in exchange for a monetary incentive, gift or other compensation/reward.

c. When an athlete, official or member of the entourage encourages, enables or instructs another party to bet or gamble on a sport event or competition to which he or she is personally connected.

d. When an athlete, official or member of the entourage ensures that an incident, occurrence or event takes place, in exchange for which he or she expects to receive or has already received compensation/reward.

e. When an athlete, official or member of the entourage receives or provides any monetary incentive, gift or other compensation/reward in a context which can reasonably be expected to bring the athlete or the sport into disrepute.

f. When an athlete, official or member of the entourage uses any “Inside Information” for betting purposes, including disclosing “Inside Information” to any person (with or without reward) where the individual might reasonably be expected to know that its disclosure could be used in relation to betting.

g. When an athlete, official or member of the entourage does not provide information to the competent IF or competition authority (without undue delay) regarding the full details of any approaches, invitations to engage in conduct, or incidents that would amount to a breach of the IF or competition rules related to betting.

h. When an athlete, official or member of the entourage does not cooperate with any reasonable investigation carried out by the IF or competition authority, including failure to provide relevant information and/or requested documentation, including records relating to the alleged breach (such as itemised telephone bills, bank statements, internet service records, computers, hard drives and other electronic information storage devices).

i. When an athlete, official or member of the entourage knowingly assists, covers up or is otherwise complicit in any acts previously described committed by another party. The individual shall be treated as having committed such acts himself and shall be liable accordingly.

j. When an athlete, official or member of the entourage induces, orders or supports any participant to commit any of the listed offences.

Any official, athlete or direct participant in the Muaythai community found to be committing the related offenses faces the possibility of disqualification, disciplinary action, legal action and investigation.

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